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Pregnancy Bliss | Reproductive Health Hub

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Sex and pregnancy


Is sex during pregnancy a good idea?

There is normally nothing to prevent a pregnant woman from continuing to enjoy a normal sex life with her partner.


A problem may arise if there is vaginal spotting or bleeding in pregnancy. This may very well be the result of an innocent cervical condition. However, since penetrative sexual intercourse could provoke further bleeding, the standard advice for a woman with this problem is to avoid penetrative sex.


Those women who have confirmed placenta praevia (where the placenta is too close or covering the cervix) are firmly advised to stay off penetrative sex, as this could provoke heavy and very frightening bleeding.


All the above-mentioned problems are normally confined to the latter half of pregnancy.


Work and pregnancy

At what stage should a working pregnant woman plan to give up work?

There is no way anybody can give a standard answer on this. Every individual's circumstances are different and it is those factors that influence a decision on how long to continue working while pregnant.


Factors such as the type of job, the woman's general heaworking during pregnancylth, pregnancy type (singleton or twins), and the presence or absence of potential problems (such as placenta praevia or high blood pressure) will have an influence on this decision.


For a woman who is doing an office job with low physical stress, it would be all right for her to continue working as long as possible, if that is what she wants. It certainly won't have any adverse effect on the pregnancy.


The advice, therefore, is for every woman with a normal pregnancy to listen to her body.







Last update: March 1, 2012


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